Posted 11 hours ago
Posted 1 day ago

psychlowdown:

Dulé Hill takes the #IceBucketChallenge
         ”I nominate Jaleel White, Lamorne Morris, Timothy Omundson, Maggie Lawson, James Roday, Andrew Porteous, and Georgia Maher. That’s right - I’m talking to you @TexasArtChick! I’m doing this for the late Andrene Dipronio, always love to the Gabay family!”

Yay! Dulé did the challenge and nominated his Psych co-stars!

For more information on ALS and how to donate, check out ALSA.org

(Source: verbivore8642)

Posted 1 day ago

onlylolgifs:

Ice Bucket Challenge Fail Compilation

Posted 1 day ago

thorinobsessed:

monumentofallyoursins:

psychoticrambling:

falling-through-the-time-vortex:

kamachameleon:

k-hiq:

skylark11:

a lake in montana whose water is so clear it appears shallow, when really its over 100 feet deep!

this is actually kinda terrifying because what if someone doesn’t know how deep it is, so they go diving and try to swim to the bottom, but they always seem just out of reach, so they just keep swimming… and when they realize something’s wrong it’s too late

Imagine seeing a body at the bottom….

tumblr has the ability to turn everything beautiful into something terrifying 

What if you see a skeleton at the bottom of what appears to be a shallow part of the lake. As you dive down to check them out you notice the water is deeper than you originally thought. Much deeper. You come to realize that there is no way these remains could be human, you’re not even half-way down and already the skull already looks bigger than your car

This started so tranquil and then it turned into Friday the 13th

(Source: niftyjaguar)

Posted 1 day ago

dragonnan:

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                 
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


CREDIT [X]  [X]

Would you ever tell someone with a broken leg to “just walk it off”?

From personal experience, a panic attack can hit utterly without warning. It’s like a rabid fox busting out of a bush and biting your face. I’m guessing you’d never suggest someone with rabid fox face trauma would recover if they simply willed it away.

Posted 1 day ago

Sorry for the bad quality picture (and bad angle but I asked my little sister to take it), but this is mainly to get opinions. ;)

This is my cosplay - still a WIP - for the Doctor Who event my sister, cousin, and I are attending on Monday. I’m mainly stuck on the shoes, but I think I’m going to end up going with black flats instead of the boots… Boots and shorts seems to be more of an Amy choice than a Clara one… Thoughts?

theendlesswonderer

Posted 2 days ago

omgpoetry:

this is funny

like really, really funny

Posted 3 days ago
facts-i-just-made-up:

the-hp-fandom:

sprigner:

zanetehaiden:

facts-i-just-made-up:

The man with metal blood.
Eric Virkeliglangtnavn of Norway is unique among the seven billion people on Earth: He likes Nickelback. No but seriously, he has fucking METAL BLOOD.
In normal blood, hemoglobin bonds with oxygen to carry it to cells. In Eric’s bloodstream however, hemoglobin is not present. Oxygen in his blood cells is instead carried by Gallium, which forms an identical bond. Scientists remain uncertain how Mr. Virkeliglangtnavn contracted the condition, but some theroize that his mother listened to Darkthrone while pregnant.

This is a picture of mercury flowing out of someone’s hand. Five seconds of Google people. Five fucking seconds.

The URL is literally facts I just made up did u even really have to google that

His last name translates to Seriouslylongname

Ah memories…

facts-i-just-made-up:

the-hp-fandom:

sprigner:

zanetehaiden:

facts-i-just-made-up:

The man with metal blood.

Eric Virkeliglangtnavn of Norway is unique among the seven billion people on Earth: He likes Nickelback. No but seriously, he has fucking METAL BLOOD.

In normal blood, hemoglobin bonds with oxygen to carry it to cells. In Eric’s bloodstream however, hemoglobin is not present. Oxygen in his blood cells is instead carried by Gallium, which forms an identical bond. Scientists remain uncertain how Mr. Virkeliglangtnavn contracted the condition, but some theroize that his mother listened to Darkthrone while pregnant.

This is a picture of mercury flowing out of someone’s hand. Five seconds of Google people. Five fucking seconds.

The URL is literally facts I just made up did u even really have to google that

His last name translates to Seriouslylongname

Ah memories…

Posted 4 days ago

monobeartheater:

arcticmowsy:

aerostarmonk:

The man entered his home and was absolutely delighted when he discovered someone had stolen every lamp in the house.

oh my god

i just do not understand this post what even

Posted 5 days ago

iamtonysexual:

did-someone-say-darren:

accioblaine:

TIP:

When you see that John Green or the staff supposedly commented on a text post, click their name. If it brings you to the post, they actually did, if it just brings you to their blog, it was manipulated.  

WHY DOESNT THIS HAVE A MILLION NOTES THIS IS A BREAKTHROUGH

how did so many people not know this is what i’m wondering

(Source: pondsandwilliams)